Learn the Russian Numbers from 1 to 1000 Without Going Crazy

By Ari Helderman
April 12, 2022

If you want to learn to speak Russian, it’s mandatory to learn the Russian numbers.

Maybe you’ve tried learning them before and found it difficult.

But in reality, it doesn’t have to be difficult to learn numbers in Russian.

How to learn the Russian cardinal numbers?

Just like in the English language, the Russian cardinal numbers have a system to them. So instead of needing to learn 1000 different numbers for the numbers 1-1000, you can simply learn the system. Then, you can combine around 35 different numbers to create all the other number combinations.

So focus on learning those couple of essential ones. And then work on combining them.

Watch this video where I tell you in Russian (with English subtitles) 9 reasons why Russian is actually easy to learn.

Russian numbers 1-10

Let’s start this lesson with the first Russian numbers one to ten. These are the fundamentals of knowing how to count in Russian.

Russian numbers 1-10Pronunciation
ноль0nol’
один1odin
два2dva
три3tri
четыре4chetyre
пять5pyat’
шесть6shest’
семь7sem’
восемь8vosem’
девять9devyat’
десять10desyat’

Take your time to go through these Russian numbers. Don’t hurry. Read them a couple of times, and see if you can remember them. And try to focus on your own pronunciation of the Russian numbers.

Important here is that the first two numbers (one and two) change their ending based on the noun that follows. If a noun is masculine, you use the standard ending. If a noun is feminine, you use the feminine ending. The same thing works for the neuter ending (but only for the number one):

Number 1-2Gender
один домone housemasculine
одна книгаone bookfeminine
одно сольнцеone sunneuter
два котаtwo catsmasculine
две собакиtwo dogsfeminine

Count to 20 in Russian

Let’s continue counting. For the numbers 11-19, all you need to do is:

  • subtract 10.
  • Take the original number.
  • Remove the last letter if it’s a soft sign or a vowel.
  • Then you want to be adding надцать to the word that’s left

An example for the number 14.

The original number is 4: четыре.

So the number for 14 is: четырнадцать.

Simple, right?

See if you can find the original numbers from 110 to 20 in the following list:

Russian numbers 11-20Pronunciation
одиннадцать11odinnatdsat’
двенадцать12dvenadtsat’
тринадцать13trinadsat’
четырнадцать14chetyrnadsat
пятнадцать15pyatnadtsat
шестнадцать16shetnadtsat’
семнадцать17semnadtsat’
восемнадцать18vosemnadtsat’
девятнадцать19devyatnadtsat’
двадцать20dvadtsat’

Did you see I added the number 20 there at the end? Can you find out how I made it?

You can see that it’s basically just the regular number for 2: два.

With the addition of дцать.

дцать is the old word for 10 in the Russian language. That’s also why 17 for example is literally in old Russian: seven-after-ten.

This only works for the numbers 20 and 30. After that, they sometimes become irregular or add the regular word for 10: десят (without the soft sign ь). You’ll see those Russian numbers below.

How to count to 100 in Russian

Now, for the numbers after 20, we use a little different rule. It’s actually similar to the English language, where we also use compound numbers.

Compound numbers are numbers that consist of 2 different numbers.

For example, the word for 21 is:  – двадцать один (dvadtsat’ odin)

It consists of 20 and 1. Easy, right?

So the rest of all the numbers to 99 work the same way.

The only exceptions are some of the multiples of 10. They can have their own words. You’ll see those examples below:

Russian numbers 20-100Pronunciation
двадцать20dvadtsat’
двадцать шесть26dvadtsat’ shest’
тридцать30tridtsat’
тридцать восемь38tridtsat’ vosem’
сорок40sorok
сорок два42sorok dva
пятьдесят50pyatdecyat’
пятьдесят пять55pyatdecyat’ pyat’
шестьдесят60shestdecyat’
шестьдесят три63shestdecyat’ tri
семьдесят70semdecyat’
семьдесят семь77semdecyat’ sem’
восемьдесят80vosemdecyat’
восемьдесят восемь88vosemdecyat’ vosem’
девяносто90devyanosto
девяносто шесть96devyanosto shest’
сто100sto

Russian numbers 100 and beyond

The words for the Russian numbers after 100 work similarly. For example, the word for 176 is:

сто семьдесят шесть (sto semdecyat’ shest’).

Some of the larger Russian numbers are:

Russian numbers 200+Pronunciation
двести200dvesti
триста300trista
четыреста400chetirista
пятьсот500pyatsot
шестьсот600shestsot
семьсот700semcot
восемьсот800vosemsot
девятьсот900devyatsot
тысяча1000tisyacha
тысяча двести1200tisyacha dvesti
две тысячи2000dve tisyachi
десять тысяч10000decyat tisyach
миллион1000000million
миллиард1000000000milliard

As you can see, some of the numbers here change a bit. Examples are 200 vs 600. Why does the word for 100 (сто) change? That’s because Russian has cases, and depending on the number, this can change the noun afterward. It’s a difficult part of Russian grammar, so don’t worry if you don’t completely get it right away. Please read my article on the genitive case for more information.

Russian ordinal numbers

The ordinal Russian numbers are different from their cardinal counterparts. Here they are:

Russian numbersOrdinal numbersPronunciation
первыйfirstperviy
второйsecondvtoroy
третийthirdtretiy
четвёртыйfourthchetvyortiy
пятыйfifthpyatiy
шестойsixthshestoy
седьмойseventhsedmoy
восьмойeighthvosmoy
девятыйninthdevyatiy
десятыйtenthdecyatiy
пятнадцатыйfifteenthpyatnadtsatiy
двадцатыйtwentiethdvadtsatiy
сотыйhundredthsotniy

Bear in mind that ordinal numbers are adjectives. And thus also change according to the Russian grammar rules.

About the Author

My name is Ari Helderman and I help people learn Russian through videos and blog posts where I share my experience.   I have been learning Russian since 2016. I often get mistaken for a native speaker these days, so I've learned a thing or two about what works and what doesn't if you want to speak Russian well.

Ari Helderman

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